Hampden-Sydney College

Hampden-Sydney College Logo

Basic Information

Phone Number: 800.755.0733
Fax Number: 434.223.6346
Address: P.O. Box 667 Graham Hall Hampden-Sydney, Virginia 23943

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Additional Information

President: Dr. Christopher B. Howard
School Type: Four Year College
Public/Private: Private
Religious Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (USA)
Gender Preference: Single Sex: Men
Historical Black College/University: No
School Setting:

Part of the 1,330-acre campus, picturesquely set in Virginia's historic Southside, 70 miles southwest of Richmond, has been designated a National Historic Preservation Zone. Farmville, a town of 6500, is seven miles north. None of the eighteenth-century buildings survives, but the Federal architecture first used for the western portion of the Alamo (1817, destroyed 1994) has been maintained as the dominant style for the campus.

School Size: 1050
Classroom Size: Average = 15
Student/Teacher Ratio: 10.1
Housing Availability:

Yes, guaranteed all four years.

Type of Housing: Dorms, Apartments, Suites, Fraternity Houses, Cottages.
Diversity: http://www.hsc.edu/African-American.html
Tuition:

$32,854

Financial Aid:

Yes, last year Hampden-Sydney offered over $26 million in financial assistance in the forms of scholarships, grants, loans, and student employment.

Greek Life: Yes
Sports: http://hscathletics.com/landing/index
Majors: http://www.hsc.edu/Academics.html
Application/Transfer Deadlines: Freshman - Early Decision November 15, Early Action December 15 & Regular Decision March 1. Transfers: December 1 (Spring) & July 1 (Fall)
Parking Spaces/Availability:

Yes - Freshmen are allowed vehicles.

Study Abroad: http://www.hsc.edu/Academics/Global-Education.html
Notes/School Information:

Hampden-Sydney College is a lively community seeking "to form good men and good citizens in an atmosphere of sound learning."

The mission of the College is to instill in its students a commitment to sound scholarship through studies in the natural sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences; to cultivate qualities of character and moral discernment rooted in the Judeo-Christian tradition; to develop clear thinking and expression; to promote an understanding of the world and our place in it; to impart a comprehension of social institutions as a basis for intelligent citizenship and responsible leadership in a democracy; to prepare those with special interests and capacities for graduate and professional study; and to equip graduates for a rewarding and productive life.

Hampden-Sydney is a liberal arts college for men now enrolling approximately 1,058 students. In continuous operation since November 10, 1775, the College is one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the United States, holds the oldest (1783) private charter in the South, and is the oldest of the country's few remaining colleges for men.

Hampden-Sydney is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; 404-679-4500) and is a member of the Association of Virginia Colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges, the Association of American Colleges, the Southern University Conference, the College Entrance Examination Board, the American Chemical Society, and the College Scholarship Service.

There are 96 members of the full-time teaching faculty, and a varying number of adjunct professors, highly motivated and dedicated to teaching, for a student-faculty ratio of about 10.3:1. Nearly half of the graduating seniors enter graduate or professional school.

Part of the 1,330-acre campus, picturesquely set in Virginia's historic Southside, 70 miles southwest of Richmond, has been designated a National Historic Preservation Zone. Farmville, a town of 6500, is seven miles north. None of the eighteenth-century buildings survives, but the Federal architecture first used for the western portion of the Alamo (1817, destroyed 1994) has been maintained as the dominant style for the campus.

As of 31 March 2011 the endowment portfolios had a market value of approximately $127 million. The operating budget for 2011-2012 is $61.9 million.

HAMPDEN-SYDNEY BEGAN as the southernmost representative of the "Log College" form of higher education established by the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians in America, whose academic ideal was the University of Edinburgh, seat of the Scottish Enlightenment.

The first president, at the suggestion of Dr. John Witherspoon, the Scottish president of The College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), chose the name Hampden-Sydney to symbolize devotion to the principles of representative government and full civil and religious freedom which John Hampden (1594-1643) and Algernon Sydney (1622-1683) had outspokenly supported, and for which they had given their lives, in England's two great constitutional crises of the previous century. They were widely invoked as hero-martyrs by American colonial patriots, and their names immediately associated the College with the cause of independence championed by James Madison, Patrick Henry, and other less well-known but equally vigorous patriots who composed the College's first Board of Trustees. Indeed, the original students eagerly committed themselves to the revolutionary effort, organized a militia-company, drilled regularly, and went off to the defenses of Williamsburg and of Petersburg, in 1777 and 1778 respectively. Their uniform of hunting-shirts, dyed purple with the juice of pokeberries, and grey trousers justifies the College's traditional colors, garnet and grey.

The College, first proposed in 1771, was formally organized in February 1775, when the Presbytery of Hanover, meeting at Nathaniel Venable's Slate Hill plantation (about two miles south of the present campus), accepted a gift of one hundred acres for the College, elected Trustees (most of whom were Episcopalian), and named as Rector (later President) the Rev. Samuel Stanhope Smith, valedictorian of the Princeton class of 1769, who had been actively promoting the idea of establishing a college in the heavily Scotch-Irish area of south-central Virginia since he began his ministry there in 1774. Within only ten months, Smith secured an adequate subscription of funds and an enrollment of 110 students. Intending to model the new college after his own alma mater, he journeyed to Princeton to secure the founding faculty, which included his younger brother, John Blair Smith. On that 1775 trip he also visited Philadelphia to enlist support and to purchase a library and scientific apparatus. Students and faculty gathered for the opening of the first winter term on 10 November 1775. The College has never suspended operations.

Early fund-raising efforts were varied (they included a state-sanctioned lottery) and vigorous; despite war-time inflation and other economic dislocations, financial support of and general interest in the College were such guarantees of its viability that in June 1783 the General Assembly granted by statute a charter of incorporation, partly written by Patrick Henry.

In its first fifty years the College prospered and gained the respect of the public and of the educational world. As early as the 1790s its influence was being felt elsewhere, as alumni and former presidents and faculty members began founding or organizing other institutions, including Union College, New York (1795), by ex-President J. B. Smith; Transylvania University (1798), by James Blythe, class of 1788; Princeton Seminary (1812), by ex-President Archibald Alexander; and the University of Virginia (1819), by Joseph Carrington Cabell, class of 1800. The Medical College of Virginia was opened (1838) in Richmond as the medical department of Hampden-Sydney; Union Theological Seminary in Virginia (1822) was founded at Hampden-Sydney and occupied the south end of the present campus for some seventy-five years before its relocation in Richmond.